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How did the supercontinent Pangaea affect the evolution of life on Earth?

How did the supercontinent Pangaea affect the evolution of life on Earth?

As continents broke apart from Pangaea, species got separated by seas and oceans and speciation occurred. Individuals that were once able to interbreed were reproductively isolated from one another and eventually acquired adaptations that made them incompatible. This drove evolution by creating new species.

What would happen if Pangea happen again?

The Atlantic Ocean could close up, with northern Canada crashing into the Iberian Peninsula and South America colliding with southern Africa roughly where Pangaea used to be. Or the Pacific Ocean could disappear, subsumed by Asia and North America.

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What do you think would happen if the continents of today joined together again?

If we turn the clock back 850 million years, we can see how the continents grew apart and back together several times. That would create a supercontinent called Amasia that would form at the top of the Earth. Eventually it would slump south toward the equator.

What would happen if Pangaea had not broken into different parts?

Much of the interior of Pangaea would be arid, too, meaning there would be fewer lakes and therefore, less water. A Pangaea that never broke up also suggests that there are no plate tectonics, therefore, there would be no earthquakes, no volcanoes, to tsunamis and no mountains.

How did Pangaea affect Earth?

On land, the breakup separated plant and animal populations, but life-forms on the newly isolated continents developed unique adaptations to their new environments over time, and biodiversity increased. Read more about how speciation (the formation of new and distinct species) works.

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Will the continents rejoin sometime in the future?

Just as our continents were once all connected in the supercontinent known as Pangea (which separated roughly 200 million years ago), scientists predict that in approximately 200-250 million years from now, the continents will once again come together.

How many continents did Earth have before Pangaea?

About 300 million years ago, Earth didn’t have seven continents, but instead one massive supercontinent called Pangaea, which was surrounded by a single ocean called Panthalassa. The explanation for Pangaea’s formation ushered in the modern theory of plate tectonics, which posits that the Earth’s outer shell is broken up into several plates

How many continents did Earth have 300 million years ago?

Credit: U.S. Geological Survey. About 300 million years ago, Earth didn’t have seven continents, but instead one massive supercontinent called Pangaea, which was surrounded by a single ocean called Panthalassa.

What would life be like inside Pangaea if it lived today?

A locked-in Pangaea further constrains life’s possibilities because much of its interior would be arid and hot, said Damian Nance, a professor of geosciences at Ohio University. “Because of Pangaea’s size, moisture-bearing clouds would lose most of their moisture before getting very far…

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How did the 7 continents come together?

From about 300 million to 200 million years ago, all seven modern continents were mashed together as one landmass, dubbed Pangaea. The continents have since “drifted” apart because of the movements of the Earth’s crust, known as plate tectonics.